I
nternet gathering place for custom rod builders
  • Custom Rod Builders - This message board is provided for your use by the sponsors listed on the left side of the page. Feel free to post any question, answers or topics related in any way to custom building. When purchasing products please remember those who sponsor this board.

  • Manufacturers and Vendors - Only board sponsors are permitted and encouraged to promote and advertise products on the board. You may become a sponsor for a nominal fee. It is the sponsor fees that pay for this message board.

  • Rules - Rod building is a decent and rewarding craft. Those who participate in it are assumed to be civilized individuals who are kind and considerate in their dealings with others. Please respond to others in the same fashion in which you would like to be responded to. Registration IS NOW required in order to post. You must include your actual First and Last name and a correct email address when registering or posting. Posts which are inflammatory, insulting, or that fail to include a proper name and email address will be removed and the persons responsible will be barred from further participation.

    Registration is now required in order to post. You must include your actual First and Last name and a correct email address when registering or posting.
SPONSORS

2019 EXPO
EXPO ON FACEBOOK
CCS Database
Int. Custom Rod Symbol
Common Cents Info
American Tackle
Angler’s Roost
Anglers Rsrc - Fuji
Anglers Workshop
BatsonRainshadowALPS
BRC Rods
Bingham Enterprises
CRB
Cork4Us
HNL Rod Blanks–CTS
CTS New Zealand
Custom Fly Grips LLC
Decal Connection
Flex Coat Co.
Get Bit Outdoors
Hitena USA
HYDRA
Janns Netcraft
Mickels Custom Rods
Mudhole Custom Tackle
MHX Rod Blanks
North Fork Composites
Pacific Bay
ProProducts
Reelseatblanks.com
Renzetti Inc.
Rougarou Rods
Rodgeeks
RodMaker Magazine
RodMaker Magazine Blog
Schneiders Rod Shop
SeaGuide Corp.
Tackleworks
The Rod Room
Trondak U-40
Utmost Enterprises
VisualWRAP/VisualWEAVE
ZipCast

Pages: Previous12
Current Page: 2 of 2
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Phil Ewanicki (---.res.spectrum.com)
Date: December 23, 2018 11:09AM

Richard: When I started fishing spinning reels were curiosities and nearly every casting reel was direct drive - the reel handle spun backward during the cast. Then the spinning reel took over and for 60+ years monopolized bait and lure fishing. In the last 15 years or so I have returned to revolving spool reels for fishing fresh water and the surf. Modern revolving spool reels have pretty much eliminated line over-runs (backlash) in the hands of a moderately experienced caster. Line twist is not an issue with a conventional reel. A star drag is the most efficient and trouble-freetype of drag. Conventional reels will cast as far and farther than a spinning reel, especially with heavier lines. The instant "free spool" and instant return to a pre-set drag of a conventional reel are big advantages over spinning reels while bait fishing. It seems to me that casting reels are less susceptible to damage and breakdowns than spinning reels. It's nice to set the drag, cast bait on a circle hook, turn on the clicker, and lever my conventional reel into free spool - and instantly back to a pre-set drag when I get a hook-up.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Richard White (204.111.141.---)
Date: December 23, 2018 11:10AM

David Baylor Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Richard, if you're serious about learning bait
> casters, I'd suggest starting off with one that
> has a magnetic braking system. They're more
> forgiving for a beginner, and in most cases they
> offer easier adjustment. The key to learning is
> not trying to learn on a rod that is too stiff. A
> medium power, fast action rod, 12# nylon mono
> filament line, and 3/8 oz casting weight would be
> a great starting point.
>
> Don't try to bomb your casts at first. Take your
> time, and get the feel for it. It will take time
> to train your thumb. And whatever you do, do not
> take your thumb off the spool. Taking your thumb
> off the spool as a beginner, is a major backlash
> waiting to happen. And backlashes are inevitable.
> I've been using bait casters for more than 40
> years and I still get backlashes every now and
> again. I guess what I'm saying is, don't let the
> fear of a backlash stop you from learning how to
> use a bait caster.
>
> Even professional bass fisherman get backlashes.

David that’s some great information thank you. What type bait caster would suggest for a rookie wanting to learn ?

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Richard White (204.111.141.---)
Date: December 23, 2018 11:37AM

Phil Ewanicki Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Richard: When I started fishing spinning reels
> were curiosities and nearly every casting reel was
> direct drive - the reel handle spun backward
> during the cast. Then the spinning reel took over
> and for 60+ years monopolized bait and lure
> fishing. In the last 15 years or so I have
> returned to revolving spool reels for fishing
> fresh water and the surf. Modern revolving spool
> reels have pretty much eliminated line over-runs
> (backlash) in the hands of a moderately
> experienced caster. Line twist is not an issue
> with a conventional reel. A star drag is the most
> efficient and trouble-freetype of drag.
> Conventional reels will cast as far and farther
> than a spinning reel, especially with heavier
> lines. The instant "free spool" and instant return
> to a pre-set drag of a conventional reel are big
> advantages over spinning reels while bait fishing.
> It seems to me that casting reels are less
> susceptible to damage and breakdowns than spinning
> reels. It's nice to set the drag, cast bait on a
> circle hook, turn on the clicker, and lever my
> conventional reel into free spool - and instantly
> back to a pre-set drag when I get a hook-up.

Phil some more great information. I’ve had very little break down on my reels mostly to my maintenance of my reels. For my surf reels there taken apart clean and lubed before I go. Then again once I get back. My fresh water gear is taken apart lubed twice a year. Might be why I’ve got reels from when I was in my teens that my sons are using now

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: ben belote (---.zoominternet.net)
Date: December 23, 2018 11:44AM

hi Richard..you also might do better learning with a slower action rod, nothing too fast and braided line was easier to control than mono.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Richard White (204.111.141.---)
Date: December 23, 2018 12:09PM

ben belote Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> hi Richard..you also might do better learning with
> a slower action rod, nothing too fast and braided
> line was easier to control than mono.


I was going to ask about braid on bait casters. I think I have maybe two rods that don’t have braid

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: David Baylor (---.neo.res.rr.com)
Date: December 24, 2018 06:10PM

Richard, I can't offer a suggestion for a reel from personal experience. I use Shimano reels and they only offer reels with centrifugal cast control. With that said Daiwa and Abu Garcia offer reels with magnetic cast control. Were I you I'd go on some of the larger tackle web sites and look through the reviews posted for different reels.

Also I don't mean to make it sound like it's a lot harder to learn on a reel with a strictly centrifugal braking system, because it isn't. It's just that magnetic systems are more consistent in their braking. I haven't looked at a magnetic cast control reel in quite some time, but unless things have changed, you can never completely turn off the braking of a magnetic system. The mere presence of the magnets insures that. With a centrifugal system, a slight change in spool speed for a second or two can begin a backlash.

And yeah, I guess braid may be easier to learn with. Myself I rarely use braided line. What I have found with braided line is, that its limpness means it doesn't balloon off the reel like stiffer lines, so backlashes usually don't go as deep. And if and when you do get a severe backlash, you don't really have to worry about it kinking badly as you pull out the backlash. I don't know if it's easier to learn with, but it does have definite benefits when it comes to backlashes.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Norman Miller (---.lightspeed.jcsnms.sbcglobal.net)
Date: December 24, 2018 07:56PM

The new Shimano Curado DC has magnetic braking, and costs about $250. The non magnetic centrifugal breaking Curado K is about $167. Never tried a magnetic control bait caster, it’s got my curiosity up.
Norm

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Richard White (204.111.141.---)
Date: December 24, 2018 08:10PM

David Baylor Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Richard, I can't offer a suggestion for a reel
> from personal experience. I use Shimano reels and
> they only offer reels with centrifugal cast
> control. With that said Daiwa and Abu Garcia offer
> reels with magnetic cast control. Were I you I'd
> go on some of the larger tackle web sites and look
> through the reviews posted for different reels.
>
> Also I don't mean to make it sound like it's a lot
> harder to learn on a reel with a strictly
> centrifugal braking system, because it isn't. It's
> just that magnetic systems are more consistent in
> their braking. I haven't looked at a magnetic cast
> control reel in quite some time, but unless things
> have changed, you can never completely turn off
> the braking of a magnetic system. The mere
> presence of the magnets insures that. With a
> centrifugal system, a slight change in spool speed
> for a second or two can begin a backlash.
>
> And yeah, I guess braid may be easier to learn
> with. Myself I rarely use braided line. What I
> have found with braided line is, that its limpness
> means it doesn't balloon off the reel like stiffer
> lines, so backlashes usually don't go as deep. And
> if and when you do get a severe backlash, you
> don't really have to worry about it kinking badly
> as you pull out the backlash. I don't know if it's
> easier to learn with, but it does have definite
> benefits when it comes to backlashes.

David I have used power pro since it came out. I was at Dave’s Fisherman’s World in Holiday Florida a rep came in and asked if the could leave a couple spools for them to try. I happen to ask the guy if I could buy a spool and he just gave me 150 yd spool. I had just bought a bai t runner reel so we put backing on it then the line. I was shocked at how much better and longer a cast a was getting with just a DOA shrimp. Well years later I to this day use it. I have it from 5 lb to 40 lb. I’ve never had issues with it even on the wildest of days. I have noted it couple time you just pull and it comes right out.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Richard White (204.111.141.---)
Date: December 24, 2018 08:11PM

Norman Miller Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The new Shimano Curado DC has magnetic braking,
> and costs about $250. The non magnetic centrifugal
> breaking Curado K is about $167. Never tried a
> magnetic control bait caster, it’s got my
> curiosity up.
> Norm


Norman thank you this information I’ll look into them for sure

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: ben belote (---.zoominternet.net)
Date: December 24, 2018 11:32PM

if i was using mono, i would use a mag reel but with braided centrifical works very well..magnets also add weight.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: David Baylor (---.neo.res.rr.com)
Date: December 25, 2018 10:22AM

While Shimano's DC reels do actually have a magnet present, it isn't like the magnetic cast control on other reels. The DC braking system is an electromagnetic computer controlled system. Things may have changed since I last explored magnetic braking systems, but it used to be that a dial on the non handle side of the spool was turned, and turning the dial moved the magnets closer to, or further away from the spool. That may not be how they work now, I don't know.

I just bought a Curado K about a month ago. I am building a new rod, and needed a new reel to put on it. (well I didn't really need it, but I wanted it lol) I almost went with the new DC Curado. The only thing that stopped me was the decreased line capacity it has versus the standard Curado K. That and the Curado K is black and it will look sweet on the new rod. :o)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/25/2018 10:24AM by David Baylor.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Chris Harban (---.gold.air-pipe.com)
Date: February 18, 2019 11:56PM

An older thread, but for the people who are cursed to fish in kayaks, I will share my biased opinions.

I like the rods to be 7' or shorter. 7' is the length where I can not have to let go or re-position the reel hand, and with the other hand clear any line or what not that tangles at the tip. When landing big fish, long rods make it difficult to bring the fish to the net, as someone else previously mentioned. Here in the Northwest, long rods are favored for trolling for chinook and sockeye, 9' plus. I watched someone in a kayak spend over 30 minutes to lose a nice chinook that he could not bring close enough to the boat to net it. That fish should have been landed in 10 minutes with a shorter rod.

I see a lot of folks in kayaks using long rods, and I wish I could figure out what I am missing?

For trolling, or fish bigger than bass, crappy, perch, etc, I like glass rods. This opinion was formed after finding a nice stack of various sizes of old Sabres, Fenwicks, Kencors, good ones, and then searching them out because they worked so well. For salmon trolling, big trout, etc, the Sabre 1970C is the 'buy all, end all, for me. It is perfection for kayak trolling of these species. Plenty sensitive for sockeye and larger kokanee, and plenty of backbone for 30lb chinook. Trolling for Kamloops that can weigh well over 25lbs, I run 4 rods, 2 with planer boards, 1 lead line, and 1 long line. Yes, that is legal on the local lake.

Holding a big net in one hand, a rod in the other with a big chinook, and trying to bring the 2 together somewhat gracefully, it is nice to not have to worry about a little high-sticking, or other things that would break a lot of graphite rods. When more powerful fish decide to swim in scary directions, it is comforting to know that the rod is not likely to break. Good glass rods are awesome.

For bass, the kayak does not change my rod preferences, except for maybe a limit to 7'6" for any rod except maybe fly rods.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Chris Harban (---.gold.air-pipe.com)
Date: February 18, 2019 11:56PM

An older thread, but for the people who are cursed to fish in kayaks, I will share my biased opinions.

I like the rods to be 7' or shorter. 7' is the length where I can not have to let go or re-position the reel hand, and with the other hand clear any line or what not that tangles at the tip. When landing big fish, long rods make it difficult to bring the fish to the net, as someone else previously mentioned. Here in the Northwest, long rods are favored for trolling for chinook and sockeye, 9' plus. I watched someone in a kayak spend over 30 minutes to lose a nice chinook that he could not bring close enough to the boat to net it. That fish should have been landed in 10 minutes with a shorter rod.

I see a lot of folks in kayaks using long rods, and I wish I could figure out what I am missing?

For trolling, or fish bigger than bass, crappy, perch, etc, I like glass rods. This opinion was formed after finding a nice stack of various sizes of old Sabres, Fenwicks, Kencors, good ones, and then searching them out because they worked so well. For salmon trolling, big trout, etc, the Sabre 1970C is the 'buy all, end all, for me. It is perfection for kayak trolling of these species. Plenty sensitive for sockeye and larger kokanee, and plenty of backbone for 30lb chinook. Trolling for Kamloops that can weigh well over 25lbs, I run 4 rods, 2 with planer boards, 1 lead line, and 1 long line. Yes, that is legal on the local lake.

Holding a big net in one hand, a rod in the other with a big chinook, and trying to bring the 2 together somewhat gracefully, it is nice to not have to worry about a little high-sticking, or other things that would break a lot of graphite rods. When more powerful fish decide to swim in scary directions, it is comforting to know that the rod is not likely to break. Good glass rods are awesome.

For bass, the kayak does not change my rod preferences, except for maybe a limit to 7'6" for any rod except maybe fly rods.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Rods for kayak fishing
Posted by: Chris Harban (---.gold.air-pipe.com)
Date: February 18, 2019 11:57PM

An older thread, but for the people who are cursed to fish in kayaks, I will share my biased opinions.

I like the rods to be 7' or shorter. 7' is the length where I can not have to let go or re-position the reel hand, and with the other hand clear any line or what not that tangles at the tip. When landing big fish, long rods make it difficult to bring the fish to the net, as someone else previously mentioned. Here in the Northwest, long rods are favored for trolling for chinook and sockeye, 9' plus. I watched someone in a kayak spend over 30 minutes to lose a nice chinook that he could not bring close enough to the boat to net it. That fish should have been landed in 10 minutes with a shorter rod.

I see a lot of folks in kayaks using long rods, and I wish I could figure out what I am missing?

For trolling, or fish bigger than bass, crappy, perch, etc, I like glass rods. This opinion was formed after finding a nice stack of various sizes of old Sabres, Fenwicks, Kencors, good ones, and then searching them out because they worked so well. For salmon trolling, big trout, etc, the Sabre 1970C is the 'buy all, end all, for me. It is perfection for kayak trolling of these species. Plenty sensitive for sockeye and larger kokanee, and plenty of backbone for 30lb chinook. Trolling for Kamloops that can weigh well over 25lbs, I run 4 rods, 2 with planer boards, 1 lead line, and 1 long line. Yes, that is legal on the local lake.

Holding a big net in one hand, a rod in the other with a big chinook, and trying to bring the 2 together somewhat gracefully, it is nice to not have to worry about a little high-sticking, or other things that would break a lot of graphite rods. When more powerful fish decide to swim in scary directions, it is comforting to know that the rod is not likely to break. Good glass rods are awesome.

For bass, the kayak does not change my rod preferences, except for maybe a limit to 7'6" for any rod except maybe fly rods.

Options: ReplyQuote
Pages: Previous12
Current Page: 2 of 2


Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
Webmaster