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Extreme Dry conditions vs extreme humidity
Posted by: David Wilson (---.no.no.cox.net)
Date: June 07, 2021 09:30AM

Hi All,

I recently moved to Phoenix AZ after living in south MS all of my life. As I prepare to start building rods again, I was curious what differences I should expect to see with building in such dry conditions. Has anyone found major differences with how epoxy acts from one climate to another?

Thanks in advance!

-David

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Re: Extreme Dry conditions vs extreme humidity
Posted by: Tom Kirkman (Moderator)
Date: June 07, 2021 09:44AM

Only temperature will affect the epoxy. Humidity will not. If your application area is room temp, then the epoxy won't behave any differently than it did in your previous location.

.............

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Re: Extreme Dry conditions vs extreme humidity
Posted by: David Wilson (---.no.no.cox.net)
Date: June 07, 2021 10:08AM

Excellent, thank you Tom

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Re: Extreme Dry conditions vs extreme humidity
Posted by: Kent Griffith (---)
Date: June 07, 2021 11:05AM

Here is a website with more information about epoxy curing. Tom is right about temperature...

[entropyresins.com]

Epoxy Temperature and Curing

The warmer the temperature of curing epoxy, the faster it cures. Three things contribute to epoxy’s temperature:

The general surrounding temperature of your work area, or ambient temperature.
The temperature of the surface you’ve applied the epoxy to, which is also a part of ambient temperature.
The heat the epoxy generates as it cures, or exothermic heat.



To adapt to warmer temperatures, use a slower hardener to increase or maintain your open time. You can also mix smaller batches and use them up quickly. Or pour the epoxy mixture into a container with greater surface area (such as a roller pan) to allow exothermic heat to dissipate, extending open time. The sooner the mixture is transferred or applied (after thorough mixing), the longer the mixture’s available open time for coating, lay-up, or assembly.

In cool conditions, use a faster hardener or use supplemental heat to raise the epoxy temperature above the hardener’s minimum recommended application temperature. Use a hot air gun, a heat lamp, or another heat source to warm the resin – before mixing or after the epoxy is applied. Do not heat hardeners prior to mixing with resins. You can speed the epoxy cure time by applying supplemental heat to the curing epoxy.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/07/2021 11:06AM by Kent Griffith.

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Re: Extreme Dry conditions vs extreme humidity
Posted by: roger wilson (---)
Date: June 07, 2021 12:05PM

David,
Because Az is much less humid than MS and depending on your location, you may find that dust could be more of an issue.

If you live in the desert (Arizona) - very low levels of precipitation, a lower level of vegetation around - and sometimes a lot of wind - be aware of dust.

Depending on your building area - you may have to take extra precautions when it comes time for applying finish and having the parts dust free.

If you live in a development with a lot of asphalt and concrete around - then it will be a lesser issue.

Take care

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Re: Extreme Dry conditions vs extreme humidity
Posted by: Mark Talmo (---)
Date: June 07, 2021 03:53PM

David,
All of the above are excellent replies and correct. Allow me to offer advice with mixing to you and those who may be unaware. The 2-part epoxies we use are DIFFERENT than 2-part Polyester resin (aka fiberglass resin); while the ratio of MEKP hardener for FG resin can be altered to achieve a shorter or longer pot life, it is critical that epoxy ratios are kept to the specified ratio designed by the manufacturer. The only exception I can think of is CTS Crystal Coat which allows slightly different ratios for different results.

Mark Talmo
FISHING IS NOT AN ESCAPE FROM LIFE BUT RATHER A DEEPER IMMERSION INTO IT!!! BUILDING YOUR OWN SIMPLY ENHANCES THE EXPERIENCE.

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