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Trim band help
Posted by: Anthony Unger (---.15.236.249.res-cmts.ovr.ptd.net)
Date: November 01, 2018 02:44PM

Hey guys, quick question.. Im redoing a Diawa for a friend.. The guides need to be rewrapped among other things.. There is black thread with a paint band at the begining and a quarter inch back on the blank sides of the guides (for double foot guids)

What is the best way to make a 2 wrap, maybe 3 trim band in the beginning like that? Im assuming using a cut straw basically making a nail knot? Just tucking the gold band tight to the begining of the thread wraps, and doing a standard inlay for the second? Or is there a better way to achieve this...

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Mel Shimizu (---)
Date: November 01, 2018 02:56PM

Click on the library. Here it is: [www.rodbuilding.org]

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Mel Shimizu (---)
Date: November 01, 2018 02:56PM

Click on the library. Here it is: [www.rodbuilding.org]

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Anthony Unger (---)
Date: November 01, 2018 03:27PM

Ok, yeah.. Exactly as i thought... I just glanced at the pictures so if this is in the article i appologize in advance..

A trick to keep the thread from rolling over itself for the trim band at the beginning kf the wrap (last half of the article) is to split a 1" piece of straw, put in around the blank, take your thread facing toward the handle laying it along the straw, wrap over the thread back toward the guide, then take the tag end and go back toward the handle under the wraps, tighten the wraps a little so the thread doesnt roll over itself, slip the straw back towards the handle.. Viola no thread under thread.. Perfect trim band.. Faster then making loose wraps in most cases..

Thanks for the very quick reply..

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Michael Danek (---.alma.mi.frontiernet.net)
Date: November 01, 2018 05:46PM

A wrap at the end of a main wrap is fairly easy, no matter how many threads. Lay a thread and a pull loop along the blank so that when you finish your main wrap you can wrap the trim band as many threads as you want, then pull it under the main wrap. Make it a little farther around the blank than where you want it to end, then as you pull it under, help it end where you want it by pinning the thread with your thumb nail at the desired end point.

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: roger wilson (---)
Date: November 01, 2018 07:02PM

When I have a trim band at the end of the main wrap, I start with the trim band.
I lay the trim band thread down on the blank and tape the end to keep it from moving. Then, I run out to the location of the trim band, and put the trim band in place, pulling the wrap tight and using two or three open turns to get the trim wrap thread back under where the main wrap will be located.

I tape that end of the trim band down tight.

Then, I go ahead and start on the main wrap bringing the first wrap up tight to the trim band. I will make another 6 dozen main wraps and then, remove the tape holding the trim thread in place and pull both ends of the trim band tight so that the trim band is tight, under the main wrap and I will cut the end of the trim band, about a 1/2 inch under where the main wrap will be located.

Then, I go ahead and continue on with main wraps, inlay threads or what ever.

By having an inch of trim thread under the main wrap, there will be no issue to ever have the trim band come loose and or fail any time in the future.

I have never liked to use a nail knot at the end of the main wrap with so little to hold it in place.

Good luck

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Mark Talmo (---)
Date: November 02, 2018 02:05AM

I certainly agree with Michael and Roger. It really is simply utilizing the basic Adding or Dropping of threads. Starting with the trim color, wrap as many thread widths as desired and simply add the wrap color. I see no need to making a separate trim band after the main wrap. By taping the initial and subsequent tag ends of the trim thread, any width of thread trim band can be produced although I usually utilize a different method for singles which leaves no offset at all. As Michael mentioned, adding a thread early within the rotation and dropping it late will allow you to position the starting and ending points of the thread precisely and in line with all the others by carefully pulling the tag ends after a few securing wraps of the main thread. I would find that extremely tricky to accomplish with a nail knot.

Mark Talmo
FISHING IS NOT AN ESCAPE FROM LIFE BUT RATHER A DEEPER IMMERSION INTO IT!!!

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Anthony Unger (---.15.236.249.res-cmts.ovr.ptd.net)
Date: November 02, 2018 02:39AM

All ways discussed are good, and effective ways to achieve the same goal.. The nail knot approach isnt hard to get the tags inline though, just pull both in the opposite direction along the blank, both tag ends will end up alignd and tight.. I see what you guys are saying though.. The nail knot approach would be better suited for a trim band in the middle of nowwhere.. Like between guides.. For marking lengths as an example.. Everyone uses there rod for a measuring stick right? Lol

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Mark Talmo (---)
Date: November 03, 2018 12:16AM

The use of a rod as a measuring stick would be a very good candidate for the nail knot to produce the marks. Restoration of a vintage bamboo rod would be another. As for trim bands applied after the main wrap, I see no advantage. Employing the generic “Adding and dropping of threads” to produce trim bands of any width is easier, faster and better due to not having to cut the tag ends so precisely let alone carefully to avoid nicking previously secured wraps because tag ends are hidden under the main wrap, and more securely I might add.

Mark Talmo
FISHING IS NOT AN ESCAPE FROM LIFE BUT RATHER A DEEPER IMMERSION INTO IT!!!

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Anthony Unger (---.15.236.249.res-cmts.ovr.ptd.net)
Date: November 03, 2018 01:46AM

I do have to agree.. I cant argue with that.. Not that i planned to.. Thanks for the input... You mentioned bamboo...

ive been meaning to give bamboo a go.. Not sure if it's something i would really enjoy or not though.. I did have an inquiry about repairing one.. At this point i feel thats way out of my league.. But i did tell him i would take a look and if nothing else, lead him in the right direction.. I feel its a rod builders job to know when to say they cant do it.. And help an individual get the proper assistance... As an example i ws handed an orvis.. After about 15 min. Of research i found out its registered and well within its warrenty.. So i passed on the info and called it done. The bamboo rod is a clean snap, or so the owner says... Bought in england about 40 yrs ago.. Without looking at it i can tell you its out of my league.. Anyone who asks about simple trim bands has alot to learn.. Obviously.. And i cant do poor work.. Its not in My blood... Hence the questions..

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Eric MONTACLAIR (---.subs.proxad.net)
Date: November 03, 2018 03:38AM

The nail knot is usefull for trim band on translucent wrap if you do want the tag ends to show through.

________________________________________
@+
Eric
[www.emfishing.fr]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/03/2018 03:38AM by Eric MONTACLAIR.

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Michael Danek (---.alma.mi.frontiernet.net)
Date: November 03, 2018 10:03AM

The problem with the nail knot that stands by itself is that it will not work with just a few wraps, the number depending on the characteristics of the thread and the skill of the wrapper. I've gotten 4 wraps to work fairly regularly, but not often 3, and 2 is out of the question. Unless someone has a secret that I don't know, which would be nice. For all nail knots I immediately stabilize them with CP, which usually prevents them from coming loose.

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Re: Trim band help
Posted by: Mark Talmo (---)
Date: November 04, 2018 01:54AM

I have very limited experience with bamboo and with building rods for only three years, there are those who would say I have limited experience, period. The one bamboo repair I performed was a splintered/split type break which I would think to be much easier and effective to repair verses a clean break. I simply worked epoxy into the splinter and use silk thread to wrap the affected area with a 3/16 spaced spiral. Possible not real pretty but the rod is back in action. The rod was not a classic or vintage but rather a modern cheap Chinese offering.
I am also intrigued with the features of split cane rods. So much so that I am contemplating tooling up and fabricating my own. I purchased a hex split cane blank from a known dealer for $125.00 but after inspecting it realized I spent $120.00 too much; it’s junk. I should have known better. With all the hand labor, experience and skill involved, I cannot imagine receiving a quality bamboo blank for less than a minimum of $350.00. Some sell for 10 X that amount.

Mark Talmo
FISHING IS NOT AN ESCAPE FROM LIFE BUT RATHER A DEEPER IMMERSION INTO IT!!!

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